Norooz - 2564

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Norooz - 2564

Postby Liberator » Sat Mar 12, 2005 7:24 pm

Hamihanan aziz:

I'd like to convey my best wishes for the upcoming Persian Year of 2564. I wish to all of my compatriots health, happiness, and prosperity. May we together make this year the year in which the rays of the sun shall after 26 dark years shine upon our nation once again; may we hand in hand, united against evil, remove the forces of darkness that have occupied our country for so long and end the the reign of terror, death, backwardedness, and destruction.

More power to those Iranians inside Iran who are today fighting to regain their land.
Our motherland must be liberated by true Iranians this year!


Norouz Khojaste Baad


YA MARG YA AZADI!!!
MA PIROOZIM CHON HAGH BA MAAST!!!
MARG BAR JOMHORIYE KASIFE ESLAMEE!!!
PAYANDEH IRAN!!!



Ba Sepaas
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Postby Liberator » Sat Mar 12, 2005 7:25 pm

http://www.nomullas.net/shahspeachnowrouz1976.htm



A Saga Bright as Iran's Sky
Kayhan International, March 23, 1976
Message of the Shahanshah of Iran, Now Rouz 1976



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My warm salutations to the great Iranian nation; to the nation whose inexhaustible power has once again come to the fore in this magnificent ceremony marking the solidarity between the Shah and the Nation.

My salutations to the great. monarchs and courageous commanders of Iran's history; to all Iranian women and men who have handed down the flag of our ancient monarchy from one generation to the next as if in fulfilment of a sacred trust.

My salutations to Reza Shah the Great, the renowned commander of Iran's history and founder of the Pahlavi Dynasty, the man who arose from among Iranians and thought of nothing but Iran. For Iran he lived and for Iran he died.

Today, on the 2535th Imperial Now Ruz and on the 50th Now Ruz under Pahlavi rule, before the mausoleum of a great Iranian whose soul is with us, in the name of the standard-bearer of the Iranian monarchy, I renew the eternal covenant of the Pahlavi Dynasty with my nation which I am honoured to lead:

Taking Iran's history as witness, I declare that we, the Pahlavi Dynasty, nurse no love but that for Iran, and no zeal but that for the dignity of Iranians; recognise no duty but that of serving our state and our nation.

We have arisen from among the Iranian nation. We have been born in this sacred land, where we will be buried. For 50 years, the solidly united front of the Shah and the nation has been engaged in a glorious endeavour for national resurgence of Iran. For 50 years, Iran has been an Iran of construction and creativity. An interval occurred in this grand national movement. But now that sinister period is over forever.

We know for certain today that the great Iranian nation is moving down the path toward the Great Civilisation, a path which will lead in a short time to a place among the front ranks of the superior world powers.

The path we have been pursuing hand in hand since the third of Esfand (50 years ago) has indeed been long and difficult. Many of you have participated in state affairs during this period. And the rest of you, the youth and children, will be acquainted with the events of this turbulent period by leafing through the pages of history.

I do not want to leaf through these pages now, because judgment on what has happened is solely the task of history and the Iranian nation. I only remind you that in the course of this period, in one of the bleakest moments of our millennia-old history, the fruits of the arduous endeavours of the Pahlavi Dynasty's founder were undone overnight by a surprise invasion by foreign powers. Our credulity in international relations and our lack of military preparedness. for which there was indeed no chance, made the surprise attackers' task easy.

Thus, you and I, supported by God and bolstered by the everlasting bond between us, succeeded in going through this sorrowful period and starting a new chapter in our ancient history by launching the victorious movement; a chapter in which darkness has retreated before divine light forever.

It was in this new glorious era that once again the miracle of Iranian genius made history. A nation of heroic achievements created a new saga in the most humane manner possible in keeping with its ancient glories; a saga as bright as Iran's sky, as solid as the rocks of the Alborz mountain, as fecund as the azure waves of the Persian Gulf; the splendid saga of creativity and construction; the saga of free women and men, unfettered farmers and steel-muscled workers who participate in the fruits of their own labour, the fabled Education, Health and Development Corps; the saga of the nationwide promulgation of judicial and soccial justice; the saga of the establishment of full sovereign rights over our natural resources; the saga of leading a world movement for a new and just order to replace the old, unjust one.

As the commander of this monarchy, I make a covenant with Iran's history that this golden epic of modern Iran will be carried on to complete victory, and that no power on earth shall ever be able to stand against the bond of steel between the Shah and the nation. We shall never again be caught unawares. The nation and the Imperial Arrned Forces, which come from the ranks of the people and derive their power from our inexhaustible national resources, are alert day in and day out to protect their country. No foreigner or his agents will ever have the chance to penetrate the unshakable structure of our national sovereignty because Iran's destiny is now shaped by Iranians and for Iranians - and this shall always be the case.

Iran today is an Iran of construction, an Iran of Faith, confidence and hope, an Iran of humanism and spiritual maturity This is a role which we play not only domestically but also on a global scale. We know well and so do all other nations of the world that Iran today is a poweraul state whose economic, political anc military might is increasing daily and which enjoys unprececlented international prestige.

But we have declared that our power shall be used solely for the benefit of all humanity. We want peace and progress, welfare and happiness for all other peoples. Our voice in everycase is that of justice and righteousness. We see our happiness and welfare in that of others, not at their expense. The world can count on us as a powerful bulwark for justice and righteousness. And we accept this human mission with all its responsibilities willingly and consciously.

My great and beloved nation, I must once again point out that the secret of all our national achievements lies in the spiritual heritage of Iran's ancient history, in the millennia-old relationship between Imperial leadership and national power and in the mutual selflessness of these two factors.

This unity, in harmony with the power of the Imperial Armed Forces, has produced circumstances where no factor can impede the ever-accelerating progress, of our country, or its achieve ment of noble national objectives. Backed by the Almighty God, you and I, hand in hand, will pursue with iron determination our victorious march toward ever-growing greatness and power and toward constantly-expanding prosperity and happiness. Bolstered by our splendid heritage, we will build a future more magnificent than the past. Our eternal Iran will be more dignified, more powerful and more prosperous every day. May the God of Iran help us all along this glorious path.
"Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable" -J.F.K
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Postby Liberator » Mon Mar 14, 2005 3:53 pm

No-Rooz, The Iranian New Year at Present Times

http://www.iranchamber.com/culture/article...an_new_year.php



"Haft Seen"
No-Rooz, in word, means "New Day". It is the new day that starts the year, traditionally the exact astronomical beginning of the Spring. Iranians take that as the beginning of the year. This exact second is called "Saal Tahvil". No-Rooz with its' uniquely Iranian characteristics has been celebrated for at least 3,000 years and is deeply rooted in the rituals and traditions of the Zoroastrian (This was the religion of ancient Persia before the advent of Islam in 7th century A.D.).

Iranians consider No-Rooz as their biggest celebration of the year, before the new year, they start cleaning their houses (Khaane Tekaani), and they buy new clothes. But a major part of New Year rituals is setting the "Haft Seen" with seven specific items. In ancient times each of the items corresponded to one of the seven creations and the seven holy immortals protecting them. Today they are changed and modified but some have kept their symbolism. All the seven items start with the letter "S"; this was not the order in ancient times. These seven things usually are: Seeb (apple), Sabze (green grass), Serke (vinager), Samanoo (a meal made out of wheat), Senjed (a special kind of berry), Sekke (coin), and Seer (garlic). Sometimes instead of Serke they put Somagh (sumak, an Iranian spice). Zoroastrians today do not have the seven "S"s but they have the ritual of growing seven seeds as a reminder that this is the seventh feast of creation, while their sprouting into new growth symbolized resurrection and eternal life to come.

Wheat or lentil representing new growth is grown in a flat dish a few days before the New Year and is called Sabzeh (green shoots). Decorated with colorful ribbons, it is kept until Sizdah beh dar, the 13th day of the New Year, and then disposed outdoors. A few live gold fish (the most easily obtainable animal) are placed in a fish bowl. In the old days they would be returned to the riverbanks, but today most people will keep them. Mirrors are placed on the spread with lit candles as a symbol of fire. Most of the people used to place Qoran on their Sofreh (spread) in order to bless the New Year. But some people found another alternative to Qoran and replaced it by the Divan-e Hafez (poetry book of Hefez), and during "Saal Tahvil" reading some verses from it was popular. Nowadays, a great number of Iranians are placing Shahnameh (the Epic of Kings) of Ferdowsi on their spread as an Iranian national book. They believe that Shahnameh has more Iranian identity values and spirits, and is much suitable for this ancient celebration.

"Sizdah-Bedar"
After the Saal Tahvil, people hug and kiss each other and wish each other a happy new year. Then they give presents to each other (traditionally cash, coins or gold coins), usually older ones to the younger ones. The first few days are spent visiting older members of the family, relatives and friends. Children receive presents and sweets, special meals and "Aajil" (a combination of different nuts with raisins and other sweet stuff) or fruits are consumed. Traditionally on the night before the New Year, most Iranians will have Sabzi Polo Mahi, a special dish of rice cooked with fresh herbs and served with smoked and freshly fried fish. Koukou Sabzi, a mixture of fresh herbs with eggs fried or baked, is also served. The next day rice and noodles (Reshteh Polo) is served. Regional variations exist and very colorful feasts are prepared.

The 13th day of the new year is called "Sizdah Bedar" and spent mostly outdoors. People will leave their homes to go to the parks or local plains for a festive picnic. It is a must to spend Sizdah Bedar in nature. This is called Sizdah Bedar and is the most popular day of the holidays among children because they get to play a lot! Also in this day, people throw the Sabze away, they believe Sabze should not stay in the house after "Sizdah Bedar". Iranians regard 13th day as a bad omen and believe that by going into the fields and parks they avoid misfortunes. It is also believed that unwed girls can wish for a husband by going into the fields and tying a knot between green shoots, symbolizing a marital bond.

Another tradition of the new year celebrations is "Chahar-Shanbeh Soori". It takes place before Saal Tahvil, at the last Wednesday of the old year, well actually Tuesday night! People set up bon fire, young and old leap over the fires with songs and gestures of merriment like:

(Sorkhi-e to az man) Give me your beautiful red color
(Zardi-e man az to) And take back my sickly pallor!

It means: I will give you my yellow color (sign of sickness), and you give me your fiery red color (sign of healthiness). This is a purification rite and 'suri' itself means red and fiery.
"Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable" -J.F.K
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Postby Liberator » Mon Mar 14, 2005 3:54 pm

Our compatriots in Esfehan:


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Postby Liberator » Thu Mar 17, 2005 7:25 pm

Presidential Message: Nowruz

For Immediate Release
Office of the Press Secretary
March 16, 2005




I send greetings to those celebrating Nowruz.

Nowruz marks the arrival of a new year and the celebration of life. It has long been an opportunity to spend time with family and friends and enjoy the beauty of nature.

Many Americans who trace their heritage to Iran, Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Azerbaijan, Turkey, and Central Asia observe this special occasion to preserve their rich heritage and ensure that their values and traditions are passed on to future generations. This festival also reminds all Americans of the diversity that has made our Nation stronger and better.

Laura and I send our best wishes for peace and prosperity in the New Year.

GEORGE W. BUSH

http://www.whitehouse.gov/news/releases/20...20050316-8.html
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Postby IPC » Sun Mar 20, 2005 12:51 pm

Happy New Persian Year 2564 Shahanshahi

Happy New Year Everyone. Sale No khosh bashid, va Sad sal be in salha.

For more information on Shahanshahi Calendar (Persian Imperial Calendar), visit:

Why use PIY (Persian Imperial Year) Calendar?
http://hometown.aol.com/ahreemanxi/index.html

We hope freedom of our nation comes soon.

Regards,
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Postby Liberator » Sun Mar 20, 2005 7:26 pm

Reza Pahlavi Amongst the Refugees in London for Nowrooz

March 20, 2005
Iran va Jahan
Potkin Azarmehr


http://www.iranvajahan.net/cgi-bin/news.pl...5&m=03&d=20&a=7



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Iranian refugees and asylum seekers in a refugee hostel in South London were surprised today when Reza Pahlavi, turned up at their Iranian New Year celebration party without prior warning.

Some were visibly overcome with emotion when Reza Pahlavi turned up at their meagre Nowruz gathering, saying it was the last thing they ever expected.

Reza Pahlavi sat and listened to the refugees for three and half hours, listening to their harrowing tales of how and why they left Iran and to their current plight while awaiting a decision from the British Home Office on their refugee status.

Reza Pahlavi then talked about the current appeal for referendum and how different sections of the Iranian opposition have for the first time united in a common goal. He then answered all kinds of questions from those present.

The emotionally overcharged meeting finished with singing the Ey Iran national anthem and endless demands to have photos taken with the Prince. A signed copy of the book, Winds of Change was given as a Nowruz gift to all present.

All those present, even those who considered themselves in the Republican camp of the Iranian politics, said they found the whole thing to be a very uplifting experience.
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Postby Liberator » Wed Mar 23, 2005 12:30 pm

Norooz Celebrations:

Iran:


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Postby Liberator » Wed Mar 23, 2005 12:31 pm

A Day We Will Never Forget

March 22, 2005
Iran va Jahan
Potkin Azarmehr


http://www.iranvajahan.net/cgi-bin/news.pl...5&m=03&d=22&a=6



All Iranians love their New Year, Nowrooz. Literally meaning New Day, is a celebration of the first day of the spring. It represents the end of the cold winter, and the beginning of the blossoming of the trees and when life becomes new again. But perhaps Nowrooz is a painful reminder too for those in exile and even more painful for the Iranian refugees who are still waiting to obtain their refugee status.

Refugees who have fled the Islamic Republic of Iran, not only face dire financial difficulties, but they have to cope with the psychological pressures of whether they would be sent back to Iran or not. To them Nowrooz, is a day where more than ever, they remember the loved ones they left behind. The traditional Nowrooz visits, where everyone makes an effort to visit their friends, neighbours and family members; for an Iranian refugee is instead turned into a confined space of a grimy hostel or a camp, where a knock on the door is not the welcome sound of a traditional Nowrooz visit by an acquaintance but more likely by an immigration official who either has the deportation orders or the relocation papers for them.

On top of all this, there is the lack of trust towards one another. Desperate situations make desperate people and the trust towards each other and your compatriots goes out of the window. No one is prepared to discuss his or her case with another compatriot, even if they meet each other at the canteens where they get their low quality, repetitive free meals, only a few formal greetings are exchanged.

So it is not surprising if Nowrooz for an Iranian refugee is more sorrow than joy. For a refugee, Nowrooz is a day where he contemplates on his loneliness in a foreign land amongst strangers, away from his loved ones, away from the traditions he holds so dear.

When Reza Pahlavi told me he wishes to spend Nowrooz amongst Iranian refugees, I was overjoyed with his decision. I volunteered to organize the event. I knew I had to help make such a thing possible. But at the same time, I knew it would be a daunting task to organize too.

The nearest such refugee camp was on the outskirts of London, right on the other side of where I lived. I went to see some of the refugees I knew there, but I couldn't tell anyone what my real purpose was. When I asked them about how they will be celebrating Nowrooz, their hopeless eyes stared at me with some measure of contempt. Not that they said it but I felt them say "what is there to celebrate?"

I tried to overcome their melancholy. "Nowrooz is a tradition which shows, we as Iranians still exist. We must keep it alive wherever we are, under whatever conditions we are." I said to their gazed looks.

I felt I still needed to say more. I thought perhaps they are saying to themselves, its ok for this guy who doesn't have our problems, we have nothing to celebrate. So I continued "Even the Iranian soldiers who were taken into captivity by Saddam Hossein, when defending our motherland didn't forget to celebrate Nowrooz. Even in their conditions and under the menacing looks of Saddam's henchmen who loathed Iranians, our captive soldiers improvised and kept this tradition alive." I wanted to say to them, look I know I am in a better condition than you, but as hard as it may be to imagine, there have been worse situations than yours too. So I continued, "Throughout our history we have had our forefathers who kept the tradition alive even during the massacres and genocides against our people by foreign usurpers, our forefathers were killed but Nowrooz continued, Iran continued and we must continue it today" And I went on and on until I convinced them that it is necessary to set up the Nowrooz decorations and to celebrate. So we decided on a budget and I delegated one of the residents to be in charge of the Nowrooz decorations and another one to hire a keyboard so we can have some music to dance to.

However there was another problem. There was no guarantee that the people I spoke to were going to remain in the hostel for Nowrooz. A letter from NAS is slipped under the door periodically telling them that they will be displaced and sent to a new location the day after. So there was no guarantee that all the people I talked to and those I delegated to do the tasks would be there for Nowrooz.

I believed in what Reza Pahlavi had suggested and I wanted to do a good job but I found the pressure overwhelming due to the uncertainties and the fluidity of the people's movements in the camp. The long distance from where I lived didn't help either and I couldn't tell anyone where I was going after work in the evenings.

The night before Nowrooz, I was making endless calls. I wanted to make sure that the people I had encouraged were still in high spirits and would turn up for Nowrooz. Some had other family members they could go to or simply wanted to be outdoors instead of being in their dingy camp environment. How could I say no to them? I couldn't even tell them what was happening and who was coming to see them. Some of the families were given their relocation papers in the very week leading to Nowrooz. The numbers were dwindling and I couldn't do much about it.

On Sunday morning, I set off to go to the camp. In order not think about whether the day would be a disaster or not I took a book to read with me on the train. The book was on the life of Meena, the revolutionary Afghan woman leader who served her people so much during the Taliban reign and despite all adversity managed to make a difference. Meena's courage encouraged me and took my mind off the uncertainties ahead.

My mobile phone rang a few times on the train. It was friends and relatives who wanted to know whether I would be seeing them on Nowrooz. I had to decline and the noise of the train prevented me from making an excuse like I am not well. I felt bad about disappointing them but I just couldn't say where I was going. I sent a text message to my son and sent him a happy new year greeting.

When I got to the camp, I felt the numbers were sufficient. I was also pleased with the Nowrooz decorations. The keyboard player, a young refugee from Iran's Kurdistan needed some practice though, it had been a long time since he had practiced his musical abilities after he fled Iran. But then that became a subject of friendly banter too and a way to beat the melancholy that was becoming really hard to overcome.

Finally, I got a call from Reza Pahlavi, he was a few minutes away. The refugees were finally told that Reza Pahlavi is on his way and will be spending the Nowrooz with them.

However it seemed that the message just didn't register. Disgruntles of "Yeah sure thing", "Very funny", "don't joke with us" filled the air. I had to look serious and convince them that No really! the Prince is on his way and it was not a joke. I sent someone to greet the Prince at the front door and to guide him through the long dark depressing corridors of the hostel which led to the meeting hall where we were, and asked the rest to line up next to the keyboard. I, myself stayed by the door looking down the corridor. As soon as I saw the Prince walk down the other end, I gave the signal to the keyboard player to play the Ey Iran, national anthem, and for the rest to sing the anthem. Reza Pahlavi embraced me by the door and we exchanged quick New Year greetings, he then swiftly walked straight to our makeshift "choir members", shook hands with them and kissed each person present. Perhaps this was even more startling to everyone than anything else. So far it was too much of a dream any way but for the Prince to embrace them and kiss each one of them on the cheek was simply beyond their belief. In the short time they were notified of the Prince's visit, few asked me about the protocol of meeting the Prince, to which I said "No protocol, just do as you feel as if your brother is coming to visit you and say whatever you wish to say to him."

As the Prince was turning onto the next person to kiss and greet, I could see the tear drops of joy and astonishment in the eyes of those who had already been embraced.

We sat around the Haft Sin Nowrooz table. Reza Pahlavi asked the refugees to talk about why they left Iran, what they went through, and their current situation. It took a few minutes for the refugees to overcome their shock and find the ability to talk, but the Prince did very well in making them feel at ease.

Once they got going, the Prince listened to each one and to their plight carefully. As many times as you hear these harrowing individual stories, it is still unbelievable to hear some cases. Who would have thought our people would one day be reduced to this? We, the children of Cyrus the Great, who were once the masters of the world and the people in the region looked up to us, having to go through such humiliation and such hardship.

Something I heard during the discussions for the first time was that many Iraqi or Afghan nationals were recently claiming to be Iranian refugees and the disorganized British courts were granting them asylum, yet the real Iranians were refused their refugee status! The Prince was also taken back when he heard this.

Reza Pahlavi then started a discussion on what can be done about the problems, and everyone expressed their views. After the topic of asylum and refugee was discussed, the Prince talked briefly about the future and the recent appeal for referendum, and then fielded all sorts of questions. Some of the questions were by people who were against monarchy in Iran, but Reza Pahlavi felt comfortable in answering them. He insisted that we need to struggle against the common enemy. "We need to overcome our factional party politics games and think about the bigger problem which has affected all of us."

We were already well over our agreed time for booking the room with the hostel management. I went out to ask for a further extension, while the Prince continued to field questions.

Finally the Nigerian hostel management insisted on playing the "Look I have already done you lot a favor" card. No one wanted the event to finish though. The Prince gave everyone a signed copy of his book, Winds of Change, and then there was the endless demands to have photos taken with him. Everyone wanted to capture this extraordinary moment. Individual pictures, group pictures, it did not matter, they were pictures of smiles, joy and hope. I was kicking myself for not having taken pictures of before and after the Prince's arrival. Perhaps then I could have better demonstrated what an uplifting experience this really was.

Once all the cameras finally ran out of film, I got everyone around the keyboard player again, the Prince joined us as well and we all sang the Ey Iran national anthem together. Perhaps the most emotionally charged Ey Iran anthem any of us had ever sang. Our keyboard player was no Stevie Wonder and none of us were Placido Domingos, least of all me who by this time felt I was coming down with a flu, but we sang with our hearts. It was a day none of us will ever forget and we will tell our children about it. A symbolic day where the symbol of Iran's unity, the symbol of Iran's continuity and the symbol of Iran's youth and future had all gathered in one place under one roof. We had the right to sing the Ey Iran anthem louder than ever, more passionate than ever, more heartfelt than ever, and not care about our musical abilities. At that particular time, standing with the Prince amongst us, on the occasion of Nowrooz, in a room which cried out for a new paint, with a carpet that was on its last threads, we were the best choir ever assembled in the grandest place of all.

There were Iranian refugees from all different parts of Iran that day with different dialects, religious beliefs and facial features. The earlier melancholy for ALL of THEM was replaced with hope and joy. That is the power of Reza Pahlavi and the position he holds.




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"As the Prince was turning onto the next person to kiss and greet, I could see the tear drops of joy and astonishment in the eyes of those who had already been embraced."


"There were Iranian refugees from all different parts of Iran that day with different dialects, religious beliefs and facial features. The earlier melancholy for ALL of THEM was replaced with hope and joy. That is the power of Reza Pahlavi and the position he holds."
"Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable" -J.F.K
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Postby Liberator » Wed Mar 23, 2005 12:32 pm

Comments by our compatriot Khorshid on SMCCDI:
http://www.daneshjoo.org/cgi-bin/messagebo...t=ST;f=1;t=3129


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[quote][b]Mr. Azarmehr writes,

“Who would have thought our people would one day be reduced to this? We, the children of Cyrus the Great, who were once the masters of the world and the people in the region looked up to us, having to go through such humiliation and such hardship.â€
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